Health

Best Lash Extension Glue for Sensitive Eyes

It might be difficult to source and select new products, especially when it comes to specialty products like sensitive glues for your clients. However, we are here to tell you that if you follow these simple steps, it won’t be so difficult.

This article is about lash extension glue for sensitive eyes. If you want to know about other extension glues click here.

Check out the checklist we have put up to help you figure out what makes a decent eyelash extension glue for sensitive eyes, and you can also use it to help you choose other goods.

ü  Ingredients are the first and the most important items on the checklist.

Cyanoacrylate. A substance called “Cyanoacrylate,” which is the major ingredient in all eyelash extension adhesives for its curing and bonding capacity, is the main culprit which causes allergic responses to lash glue. Cyanoacrylate is present in all eyelash extension glues on the market, and no replacement is currently available. However, many individuals are unaware that there are several different forms of cyanoacrylate. Not all cyanoacrylates deserve their bad rep for triggering eyelash extension glue allergies.

Alkoxy Cyanoacrylate. Alkoxy cyanoacrylate is a low-odor, low-fume glue. This form of Cyanoacrylate is eight times as expensive as Ethyl and because of its high cost, it is rarely utilized in eyelash extension adhesive.

Methyl Cyanoacrylate is a poisonous chemical. This form of cyanoacrylate has a tight classification and is only used in industry. As methyl type is very powerful and can destroy proteins, it can cause irreversible vision loss when used in eyelash extensions. Eyelash extension adhesives of the methyl kind should never be utilized.

Ethyl Cyanoacrylate. The most prevalent form of cyanoacrylate for eyelash extension adhesives is ethyl cyanoacrylate. It has a quick drying period and a strong adhesion, but it produces a lot of fumes, odors, and discomfort.

Methoxy-Cyanoacrylate: Methoxy-Cyanoacrylate is the least irritating and unscented kind of Cyanoacrylate. It was created to alleviate the irritation and odor associated with Ethyl and Butyl type glues. However, compared to other forms of Cyanoacrylate, it has a much slower drying time and a much weaker adhesion.

-The ultimate goal of any lash extension glue manufacturer is to combine the proper amount of cyanoacrylates in one glue bottle to create a “perfectly balanced” adhesive with low fume, quick drying time, and extended retention.

Latex. Since latex (natural rubber) is known to induce allergic responses in certain people, using a glue that contains latex is not recommended. Choose a glue that incorporates elastomer (synthetic rubber), such as Q-1. Glue, a lab-made rubber, has outstanding viscosity, flexibility, and retention while causing no latex sensitivity.

ü  Number two on the checklist is the shelf life.

Did you know that sensitive glues have a shorter shelf life than ordinary lash extension adhesives? While strong lash glues can last up to 6 months unopened, sensitive glue has a far shorter shelf life of about 3 months. Any sort of glue, sensitive or not, should be utilized within a month of opening the bottle.

Calculate how many clients you actually need to serve with sensitive glue before deciding to proceed with the buy one, get one free deal, and do not overstock.

ü  Setting Speed is the third item on the checklist (drying speed).

As you may have noticed, sensitive glues require more time to set the pace than standard lash adhesive. Sensitive glues have a range of drying times ranging from 5 to 8 seconds. It is a good idea to let your lash client know about this ahead of time. Because of the nature of sensitive glue, your application time may be longer than usual.

ü  Retention is the fourth item on the checklist.

The majority of sensitive adhesives contain little to no ethyl-cyanoacrylate; therefore, their adherence is unavoidably less than “regular” glues.

Extensions can last up to 3 weeks if all of the parameters are satisfied (clean room/product, good technique, client’s health & lash condition, and aftercare). This may fall short of your client’s expectations, and you should address this with them ahead of time.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Back to top button