Automotive

4 Likely Causes for an Overheating Car Engine

When someone mentions overheating, you think of the summer driving season. However, what about when the same symptoms present in the winter? You might be surprised to find out that you can still get into trouble in winter because of ice buildup. Here are the four main reasons for an overheating car engine in winter and why you get full car service by Midas.

1. Radiator

A bad radiator fan often turns off while the vehicle is stuck in traffic, which can lead to a very high coolant temperature. In this situation, your car engine will overheat, and you’ll have to pull over or get towed to a garage. If you have any form of a defective part on your car, you need to have it checked immediately by a reputable mechanic near you! Second, you could have a plugged radiator. Plugged radiators can drain your engine of coolant and cause heat buildup in the car. You can have a bad radiator pressure cap. This pressure cap is what controls the amount of pressure in the cooling system. If it fails, coolant can escape and escape through the overflow line (a tube visible at the front of your car engine).

2. Cooling system

A vehicle’s cooling system is vital to keep the engine from overheating and causing potentially expensive damage. The job of a cooling system is to cool the engine after it has been warmed up from driving. When your coolant gets low or dirty, your engine will heat up more quickly until it reaches a boiling point. Blocked coolant flow will also make your air conditioning run inefficiently.

A bad thermostat can be another reason why your car engine overheats. You should know that there are two parts to the thermostat: the housing that sits on top of the engine block and the valve inside it. This part regulates cooling by opening and shutting as necessary. It also keeps your engine from overheating by regulating coolant flow through the radiator to keep temperatures at the optimum level.

3. Water pump

Water pump transfers heat from the engine to the radiator and allows water to transfer heat into the surrounding environment via the cooling fins on the back. The water pump has auxiliary gears that distribute coolant to the coolant jugs and other parts such as the heat exchanger.

4. Bel and hoses

Damaged belts are one of the commonly overlooked causes for engine overheating resulting in unnecessary engine damage. The truth is that if you have a modern engine, the chances are that the engine itself has protection against overheating built-in.

When you drive, there’s only one thing on your mind: safety. You want to go as far as you can and as fast as you can, without having to stop unexpectedly. Wincing as you notice the sign that says ‘car service recommended’ isn’t ideal, but it’s better than getting caught with a broken belt – especially if your driver is late and behind schedule.

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