Home Improvement

Debunking the Most Common Replacement Home Window Myths

Aluminum windows can last for one and a half to two decades, while wooden windows can last for about 30 years. Vinyl or fiberglass windows are also long-lasting, with a service life of 20 to 40 years.

Unfortunately, improper installation, severe weather, and misuse can cut their life short. When this happens, you’d need to invest in a replacement home window.

Before you do that, though, it pays to know the facts about replacement windows first. This guide debunks some of the myths and serves the truth about them, so be sure to read on.

Their Cost Is Comparable to New Construction Windows

A replacement window can cost $200 to $1,800 apiece, with the nationwide average being $650 per window. This price doesn’t include labor charges, which can cost $100 to $300 per window.

By contrast, new construction windows usually have lower-priced material. According to the site Home Advisor, their materials can be 10% to 15% cheaper. So, based on this factor alone, new windows cost less than replacement windows.

However, new construction types of home windows involve more peripheral and installation work. That’s because you need to install these windows and their nailing fins on an unfinished wall. For that reason, Home Advisor says they can cost 50% to 100% more than replacement windows to install.

Window Replacement Is Only for Old or Damaged Windows

Actually, there’s a case for not replacing centuries-old windows. A study found that restoring 200-year-old windows can make them as airtight as brand new ones.

As for damaged windows, it makes sense to replace them, as they do look unsightly. However, it may also be good to swap out single-pane windows for aesthetics and energy savings.

After all, single-pane windows are some of the chief culprits behind heat gains and losses. Most of these windows don’t have insulation, so they allow conditioned air to escape. Worse, they permit hot or cold outdoor air to enter homes.

By contrast, triple or even just double glazing Bristol windows have insulated spaces. Their multi-paned construction and insulation can boost home energy efficiency.

However, for the best results, make sure you choose Energy Star-rated replacement windows. These are far more energy-efficient than non-certified windows.

Replacement Windows Must Be of the Same Material as the Original

No, it’s fine to replace battered wood or aluminum windows with other materials, such as uPVC. uPVC stands for unplasticized polyvinyl chloride. uPVC windows have become a common alternative as they’re low-cost and low-maintenance.

Although uPVC windows are easier to maintain, cleaning them can be a bit tricky, though. However, these seven tips can help you take proper care of these replacement windows.

Replacing Windows Is Easy

Not all the time, especially not if it involves putting in a full-frame replacement window. This task requires a complete uninstallation of the existing window frame. You then have to clean and polish the area to prepare it for the new frame.

Moreover, window replacement requires many tools, such as hammers, caulking guns, and drills. You also need personal protective equipment (PPE), including glasses, gloves, and masks.

Lastly, you may void the warranty if you damage the windows as a result of DIY installation. So, always think twice and hard before you start a DIY window replacement project.

Invest in a Replacement Home Window as Needed

There you have it, the myths and facts you need to know about a replacement home window. Just remember that it may be better to restore than replace a centuries-old window. However, if you don’t have such windows, but yours have severe damage, it may be best to replace them.

Interested in learning more about window styles or other home improvement ideas? Then feel free to have a look at our other educational how-to guides!

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