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Finding an Apartment for Rent in Denver, Colorado: Tips for Potential Tenants

There are numerous benefits to renting a home. For starters, it allows you to roam around freely. It also comes with the help of not paying for routine maintenance or upgrades or even property taxes. 

Many people opt to rent a home for all of these reasons and more. However, there are some things that tenants are liable for and should take seriously when it comes to renting their place of residence. So, what are some tenant suggestions you can use to be a great tenant and get the most out of your rental experience?

Tips for finding and renting an apartment in Denver, Colorado

Whether you’re moving to Denver for educational, health, or personal reasons, there are some essential points you should consider. We’ve gathered some information on where to begin and how to complete the renting process successfully. 

1. Research the Area

The importance of location cannot be overlooked when searching for a furnished apartment in Denver. You may not realize that a tenant’s research is equally as important as a landlord’s or a real estate investor’s. After all, you’ll be spending at least a year there, right? Doing your homework will help you avoid becoming stuck in a sector you despise. 

Drive through the potential neighborhood at various times of day to get a sense of it. Look into the crime rates in the area and see what amenities are available. Is it close to your workplace? Is there easy access to shops and restaurants? What about local parks and attractions? Take advantage of the information available before signing a lease, since knowledge is power.

2. Read your lease carefully

Isn’t it simple enough? Surprisingly, the percentage of people who do not read their lease is relatively high. This causes problems later on when situations arise that you were unaware was a necessity or responsibility. As a result, be thorough. Before signing your lease, please read it thoroughly, and don’t be hesitant to ask questions. That way, before you move in, you’ll be aware of your responsibilities and what’s expected of you.

3. Fill out a move-in inspection form

Most landlords and property managers provide tenants with move-in checklists to complete at the beginning of the lease. This allows tenants to document the current state of the property and note any prior damage so that they are not held liable for it after the lease. Nobody wants to pay for someone else’s mistakes, so finish this as soon as possible and send it to your landlord. 

Don’t forget to take pictures! Pictures are more expressive than words and can help you express yourself more clearly.

4. Take Renter’s Insurance into account

Did you know that your landlord’s homeowner’s insurance policy excludes your possessions from coverage in the event of damage? Fire? Nope. Flood? Na-uh. Burglary? It’s unlikely. Is it true that the house sprouts legs and flees? Not. As a result, you should think about purchasing renter’s insurance coverage to secure your belongings. Many renter’s insurance plans can be added to current ones (i.e., auto insurance, etc.) for a modest fee, so be sure to discuss your alternatives with your insurance agent. 

5. Set Up automatic payments

Nowadays, almost everything can be paid for online, rent, utilities taxes, etc. Online payments also bring with them the convenience of automation. Why take the chance of forgetting to pay when technology can do it for you? Discuss your choices for automated payments with your landlord. Then, you won’t have to be concerned about being late again. Even if your landlord does not accept automatic or online payments, you can still use technology to your advantage. To remain on top of your expenses, set up monthly reminders on your phone or computer.

6. Report maintenance issues immediately

Whether it’s an odd noise coming from the refrigerator or a leaking water heater, it’s critical to report any maintenance issues as soon as they arise to avoid further damage to your property. Even if a repair isn’t an emergency, tenants still must do their homework and report any issues. After you’ve written the problem, please work with your landlord and their preferred contractors to schedule the repairs. Let them know that the problem has been remedied as soon as possible.

7. Be aware of the rules

Is it legal for you to paint the house you’re renting? What about parking lots? What are your plans for the holidays? Every home and lease has its own set of rules that you, as the renter, must adhere to. These restrictions include the ones mentioned in the lease and those outlined by the Homeowners Association (HOA). And each HOA is unique. If your home is part of an HOA, make sure to ask your landlord about it and get a copy of the rules and regulations so you know what to anticipate. If you want to make changes, such as painting a room, ensure you acquire your landlord’s permission in writing beforehand. If you don’t, you risk being in breach of your lease.

Conclusion

Your landlord isn’t an opponent. They’re merely a provider of necessary service for all humans. Tenants should treat their relationship with their housing provider like a business, just as landlords should handle their rental as a business. 

Even when things go wrong, remain cordial and considerate. This keeps the lines of communication open and may even encourage your landlord to be more open and eager to work with you in the future. It all boils down to the age-old adage of treating others the way you want to be treated, and it all contributes to a pleasant rental experience.

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